Jefferson Health Philadelphia Walkway

An Interview with David

An Interview with David

David Taylor travels from Bermuda to visit Thomas Jefferson Hospital

How did you get to know about PIM?

I have overactive esophageal spasms* or Hypercontractile Peristalsis. I needed somewhere I could go because pain medication doesn’t work anymore for me. Morphine takes the edge off. I needed to find a hospital I could get esophageal botox injections to ease the pain. That is how I picked Thomas Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia.

What can you tell us about the nurses and physicians at Thomas Jefferson Hospital?

They are very friendly, they call me Mr. Bermuda! The nurses tell me they are very jealous because I’m from Bermuda. But, I find the nurses and the doctors to be very professional. They are very attentive, I was very comfortable before and during my procedure.

This is a procedure that happens several times a year?

This is a procedure that happens at least 3 a year or every two to three months. It is called EDG with Botox.

Who do you interact with at Philadelphia International Medicine?

Stephanie! When I arrived there the first time, Stephanie called me. Then I walked over to meet her in the office, and then when I needed more help, that is when she introduced me to Arturo, and I thank him very much for his support. I really appreciate the help he provided to a total stranger by picking me up at the hospital after my medical procedure.

Would you recommend PIM services and Jefferson Health services?

Absolutely! I have had no problems at all with the treatment or services. I even have Dr. Kastenberg's phone number! He told me if you need me, call me and let me know what is going on. I would recommend the facilities and the personnel because I find them very professional and very helpful for an international client.

*Hypercontractile Peristalsis: is an esophageal motility disorder that is characterized by esophageal spasms that involve all or most of the muscles of the esophagus. The spasms are so intense and tend to last for a long time, making the name of the disorder, jackhammer esophagus, an adequate description of how a person with the disease might feel.

An Interview with David

Read more of our patient stories: